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iPhonography Variations

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Art, Features

living feral

Living Feral Artist Interview and Feature | DavsArt

Featuring dreamscape collage artist Tracy Jager of

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Tell us a bit about yourself:
I live on the wet green coast in Vancouver, Canada. In addition to making collages, I also sometimes draw, sew and take photos. I have a weakness for vintage and antique things, so spend a bit of time cramming my tiny home with treasures and occasionally selling them in my online vintage shops. The rest of the day I cook lots, eat frequently, take naps and dream excessively, and hang out with my animal friends.

Living Feral Artist Interview and Feature | DavsArt

When did you know that art was your thing?
Since I was young I liked making pictures, but didn’t have a lot of confidence in doing it. Also, I first wanted to be an actress or a writer. After a brief stint working in live theatre and at some other interesting jobs, I ended up as a communications consultant and writer, mostly in healthcare and health sciences. A lot of my co-workers told me I was visually talented and encouraged me to go to art school, and that gave me to the courage to do a fine arts program at Langara College while doing freelance work. I then went on to complete a BFA in Visual Art at the Emily Carr Institute of Art & Design (now University).


Tell us some of the process into making collage.
Lots and lots of cutting! I flip through stacks of the hundreds of vintage books and magazines I have, and cut out images that appeal to me…regardless of whether I have a particular use for them at the time. The act of cutting for long periods puts me in what you could call a trance or dream-like state, where my mind can make associations it might not if tasked with thinking logically. Sometimes I’ll just cut images for days at a time, and then suddenly a flood of scenes and stories will come together. Then there will be the long process of pasting them up, scanning them, and figuring out just the right title (which can sometimes come quickly, or sometimes take weeks!)

Living Feral | DavsArt


What’s your favorite part of the art making process?
The way, when I actually get right into the process, that time seems suspended. I get there sometimes when I’m drawing or sewing, but it happens most when I make collage. It’s a sensation of being totally present in the moment but also outside time.

Living Feral | DavsArt


What inspires you to create?
Well, often my work influenced by things I’ve read or think about…philosophy and poetry and psychology, for instance. I’m particularly interested in humans’ relationship with animals and the environment, and that factors into my pieces.
As for what inspires me though…besides the feeling and experience I get when actually making something, it seems to me that creating art is one of the best things humans can do. I always loved reading when I was young, and books helped me experience the world through others’ eyes and thoughts. A beautiful painting can evoke a feeling of awe. Any piece of art carries with it a sense of its creator, and I believe this sharing contributes to empathy and compassion.

Living Feral | DavsArt

What’s the most rewarding thing about sharing your art with the world?
While I’m an introvert with hermit tendencies, I do have ongoing health issues that make it challenging to be outside my home for extended periods of time. I love solitude, but I can end up feeling isolated. Through sharing my art online, I’ve met many wonderful and talented people – like you Sarah! Thanks for asking me to be a part of your Features series.
Living Feral | DavsArt
Where can we find your work?


Collages on Etsy: www.livingferal.etsy.com


Drawings & sewn things: www.raccooncatcreations.etsy.com

Vintage stuff: www.handsomeraven.etsy.com and www.hyacinthvintage.etsy.com (partner in shop)

Where can we find you?


Website: tracyjager.com


Flickr: www.flickr.com/tjager


Facebook: www.facebook.com/livingferal


Twitter: www.twitter.com/livingferal


Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/livingferal

Thank you Tracy! I really appreciate this feature. I have loved your work ever since I discovered it.

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Art, Features

Mossmottle

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Featuring Amanda Collis of Mossmottle

Tell us a bit about yourself:

Well, I am 45 years old, female, and live in Derbyshire, England. That’s about all I can say with certainty!

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When did you know that art was your thing?

I think I’ve always known that art is really the only thing I’m really any good at, or can do best. It’s really the only thing I feel real self belief about. although it wasn’t something that was part of my family background, I was always drawing and writing when I was younger; later I realized that I was pretty useless at plot, so the writing fell by the wayside! I gravitated towards painting as a way of exploring mood and atmosphere. Like Edward Gorey, though, my art training was negligible. It took until my mid thirties for me to start coming up with work of a good standard on a regular basis. I had to make a conscious commitment to painting, both in the sense of clearing away trivial stuff and directing your will unerringly towards it, or surrendering to it, and also in the practical sense of setting aside a room for a studio, spending any available money on art materials and equipment and finding and developing a place to show it online (mainly my etsy shop; I don’t drive, live in a provincial, pretty rural area and have a chronic pain condition so it just suits me better to focus on online selling).



Do you have a favorite medium?

Oil. Oil painting is completely fascinating to me. It’s intensely sensual and magical. It’s a complex alchemic medium with a richness and depth and warmth and unique way of incorporating time. This gives is a living quality that you feel and smell and see when you’re immersed in painting. It is very sensitive as a medium and can be modulated in so many ways. The depth is partly to do with a connection with art history through it.

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What’s your favorite part of the art making process?

I think it’s probably two separate stages; the initial “being beckoned to the studio” where you start feeling that you want to make something specific, even though you don’t know yet what it will be precisely. And there’s the amazing moment that can happen – if the work is any good – when it almost sort of “clicks” into place, or becomes fully present, and you know you’ve caught something. You can be really exhausted or at your wit’s end when that happens, although really I think my best stuff is done quite lightly and spontaneously, just, done at the right time. So maybe it’s the hunting side of it that appeals to me more than, say, the painstaking, slower agricultural side. Obviously later you look and think, hmm did I really capture something? No, probably not; must try to be readier next time.


What inspires you to create?

Speaking generally, it is this deep need, that you can’t really explain, it’s a physical as well as a mental thing (although I don’t make a division between the mind/body) and you feel zombielike and wretched if you haven’t painted for a while. I’ve just moved house and haven’t been able to paint for some weeks so that’s where I am right now! Also my fibromyalgia symptoms only seem to fade when I’m painting and it’s going very well. It’s a timeless, ego-less feeling, of complete immersion and through that, connection with everything, you feel where you’re meant to be and doing what you should be doing.

In terms of an individual work, it could be an experience of nature – I mean standing in a landscape, and the light is a certain way or a fleeting mood or emotion floods you, or a certain passage in a piece of music, or a scene in a film. Or it could be a painting, or more often a detail from a painting…it could be an idea from a book or a conversation, even a haunting perfume! They can all be leads.
I like the possibilities – of creating something strange-yet-familiar. I think a lot of my paintings are a response to some other cultural artifact, and I only realize this afterwards; and sometimes they wear their influences on their sleeves very consciously, but occasionally something a bit more elusive gets in (usually by accident) and those are the best, or at least the most intriguing to me. Abstract art theory can seem rather dry and academic to non-practitioners, but to me painting gives you essentially a complete freedom to explore. I love for instance exploring the boundaries between representation and gestural expression.

I tend to paint in relatively short bursts these days, so there is this sort of prelude of trying to track down this sense of something – I think it’s probably quite similar to writing a poem or creating a song. It’s hovering there and you can’t force it down you have to wait and listen, I’m saying “listen” because I seem to be quite sound-oriented and often use music as a way into painting. I’ve always found films very inspiring too as you get this blend of sound, image and movement creating a very strong experience, a unique feeling and the way they work together can be so powerful. A key scene for me is in Antonioni’s “Blow Up”, the one in which the protagonist first enters the park. He’s a photographer, drawn in by chance into exploring this quiet, open yet enclosed, lonely place, and you just see the wind in the trees and the grass and it’s just very mysterious and beautiful somehow. It’s replete with possibilities. I love the idea of making a painting with that kind of inherent mystery.

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What’s the most rewarding thing about sharing your art with the world?

I love that someone who buys a painting wants to have it as a part of their life, in their home. That is just so moving to me. And even if it eventually goes elsewhere, it has this life of its own, and that’s such a great story. I love the idea that after I’m gone, there might be a few of these little fragments left, wandering around the planet, having curious adventures. Sooner of later returning into a deeper mulch, of course! But that’s fine too – as well as inevitable!

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Where can we find you?


mossmottle/etsy

mossmottle/facebook

mossmottle/twitter

rhubarbia. blogspot

 Thank you so much Amanda, I love your work!

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Art, Features

Double Fox Studio

Featuring Flavia and Ildiko from Double Fox Studio

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Tell us about yourselves.

We are Flavia Marele and Ildiko Muresan a.k.a. Harem6 from Romania and we create mixed media art objects, jewelry and drawings. We live in Cluj, a student city in the center of Transylvania, with our two dogs and a very creative black cat.

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When did you know that art was your thing?

 We both knew ever since we were little children that we like to draw. As we grew up there were different professions we thought we’d like to embrace…

Ildiko:  I remember I thought for quite a long time that I would like to become a professional singer, but I think most of the little children think about that. At the age of 17 I decided I want to live and breathe art.

Flavia: I always wanted to be an actress for quite a long period actually, but then I decided to take the exam for the art school as I started to enjoy photographing. I also knew I like creating things and I want to do this seriously when I was a teenager.

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You do drawings as well as clay sculpting, do you have a favorite medium?

Ildiko: At the moment our favorite medium is clay. We love experiencing new techniques and materials, favorites can change but there will always be a constant favorite and for me it’s the pencil. It brings such a joy and creates the sort of comfort which only those who love it can really understand it.

What’s your favorite part of the art making process?

 Flavia: The best part is when nothing actual is happening, when it’s all in the mind. The  moment when imagination seeks for a first step  form in our minds. There is so much excitement and a thrill about the before moment of the actual creating process.

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What inspires you to create?

 There are so many inspirational things and moments. Life around us, nature, words, sad rainy days, the sun on an autumn morning, films and many more, feelings…

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What’s the most rewarding thing about sharing your art with the world?

 The positive feedback we get from those who look at what we make. The joy we bring to them makes us wish to create more.

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Where can we find your work?

Double Fox Studio on Etsy

Where can we find you?

Harem6/Double Fox on Blogspot

 

Double Fox/Harem6 on Facebook

 

Ildiko and Flavia on Twitter

 

Double Fox on Pinterest

Thank you Flavia and Ildiko, I’ve loved your work ever since I discovered it on Etsy back in 2010. Lovely!

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About Davs, Art, Features

Davs

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Featuring my own work Davs Art.

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Tell us a bit about yourself:

Well, this is harder then I thought. I decided why not? I’m featuring a variety of artists and crafters why not do a feature on myself? And now I have to answer my own questions. Here we go. I’m Sarah, but my pen name is Davs. I’m a self taught artist. When I’m not taking care of my two boys ages 4 and 11, I’m painting, blogging, or fiddling around with my new iPhonography obsession. I’m engaged to a wonderful guy who makes lodge pole furniture in the summer and works with children with special needs in a school for the rest of the year.

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When did you know that art was your thing?

I guess I always knew. I loved to draw and craft ever since I can remember. My dad is a professional window painter and artist and I used to go along with him and help paint windows when I was very little. Even as a teenager I would carry a drawing book and pencils in a backpack around with me everywhere and doodle when I could.

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Do you have a favorite medium?
I thought I did, for years oil paints were my go to, and they’re still my favorite medium. But I have been experimenting with iPhonography: taking a photo and running it through a variety of apps on my iPad to come out with something artistic. It’s so much less mess then painting, which I really appreciate. But I think I’ll go back and forth.
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What’s your favorite part of the art making process?

When I get lost in my work. It’s like going to paradise without leaving your home. At first it’s torture, and I struggle a lot with blank canvas, or now that I’m working with an iPad, figuring out what direction I want to go. But there comes a point when you dive in and it’s like being carried away to another planet for a while.
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What inspires you to create?

The feeling of escape. Not to say I don’t love my life, but sometimes I just need a break. Making art puts me in a good mood.

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What’s the most rewarding thing about sharing your art with the world?

It was scary at first, putting my stuff out there. But I found that I have really supportive friends and family that encouraged me to keep going. Eventually when I started making sales to people I didn’t know, it was exhilarating (still is) to know that someone somewhere out there connects with my work in some way. My art is hanging in homes all around the world, Australia, the UK, Finland, Canada and here in the US. I get a thrill thinking that out of all the artwork out there someone chose something of mine to include in their lives, it’s a big deal to me and it makes me smile.

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Where can we find your work?

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www.Davs.Etsy.com

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Society6.com/Davs

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Where can we find you?

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@Davenportant on Twitter

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Davs Art on Facebook

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Art, Features

JUURI & FashArtHome

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Featuring Julie Robertson of JUURI and FashArtHome

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Tell us a bit about yourself:

I’m a 29 year old Tokyo-born artist, currently living in Norman, OK in the US. I love painting Japanese themes and also wild drippy colorful abstracts. I’m also a fashion nut.

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When did you know that art was your thing?

I’ve been drawing even before I could properly speak. And I’ve just never stopped! More recently, I’ve discovered that I need to focus on art instead of any other “career”… because with anything else, I’ll never truly be happy.

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Do you have a favorite medium?

I love the unexpected nature of watercolor. It almost paints itself. I’ve also gotten into acrylics more these days. Oil pastel on canvas is new for me, but I love the brilliant hues and the deep saturation you can get with it.society617

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What’s your favorite part of the art making process?

I love getting so into a painting that I don’t know what time it is, where I am, or if I’ve eaten lunch. It’s like an art-induced amnesia! I’m sure all creative people can relate to this. It’s fantastic to be so involved in a piece like that.society61

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What inspires you to create?

My Japanese heritage, patterns, color schemes, other peoples’ art. Sunlight, travel, open fields, flora and fauna. The dark forest. Quiet patches of moss.society61

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What’s the most rewarding thing about sharing your art with the world?

When people say “This painting means so much to me because I can relate exactly to the message,” that is the best thing I could hear.

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Where can we find your work?

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Japanese art: www.etsy.com/shop/juuriart

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Abstract art: www.etsy.com/shop/fasharthome

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Where can we find you?

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Japanese art: www.juuriart.com

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Abstract art: www.fasharthome.com

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Fashion blog: www.fiercelamb.blogspot.com

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Graphic design: www.tako-tako.com

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Thank you so much, I love your work!

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